Oil Painting Course

TWO LEVELS - LEVEL 1 - CERTFICATE | LEVEL 2 - ADVANCED CERTIFICATE

ONLINE - INTERACTIVE CLASSES | @ CAMPUS (BANGALORE)

FEES STARTS @ Rs. 1995 PER MONTH

OIL PAINTING COURSE

LEVEL 1 COURSE

32 Sessions | Each Session 45 Minutes | Flexible Timing | Weekdays or Weekend

Focus Areas:

  • Delving deeper into the world of Oil painting
  • Refining skills
  • Exploring more complex subjects

Techniques:

  • Learning techniques
  • Exploring different styles and genres within Oil painting

Encouragement of Experimentation:

  • Allowing students to experiment and further develop their artistic voice

Outcome:

  • Creation of more intricate Oil paintings
  • Gaining a deeper understanding of the medium

Progression:

  • Building on the foundation 

Preparation for Advanced Levels:

  • Sets the stage for further exploration in advanced levels of the course

OIL PAINTING COURSE

ADVANCED CERTIFIED COURSE

48 Sessions | Each Session 45 Minutes | Flexible Timing | Weekdays or Weekend

This curriculum provides a structured and comprehensive approach to guide students starting from the Foundation level and moving to Intensive and then moving to creating more complex large format oil paintings. It incorporates a balance of theory, hands-on practice, and individualized feedback to ensure a meaningful learning experience.

color mixing, brushwork, layering, and texture creation. These fundamental skills serve as the building blocks for more advanced artistic expression.

Materials and Tools: The course often covers the selection and proper use of materials and tools specific to oil painting. This may include different types of brushes, canvases, palettes, and, of course, oil paints.

Composition and Design: Students may learn about the principles of composition and design to create visually appealing and balanced artworks. This involves understanding concepts like balance, focal points, and color harmony.

Hands-On Practice: A significant portion of the course is dedicated to hands-on painting sessions. Participants typically complete several small projects or studies to reinforce the techniques learned during the course.

Introduction and Theme Selection

  • Overview of the course objectives and expectations.
  • Introduction to the importance of large format paintings.
  • Discussion on various themes and concepts.

Planning and Sketching

  • Review of collected inspiration.
  • Guidance on developing a strong composition.
  • Sketching exercises to translate ideas to paper.

Building Layers and Texture

  • Discussion on color theory and palette selection.
  • Demonstrations on layering techniques for texture.
  • Hands-on application of layering and texture on canvases.

Refining Details

  • Individual feedback on paintings.
  • Techniques for refining details and enhancing depth.
  • Continued work on paintings, focusing on details.
  • Troubleshooting common challenges.

Midpoint Review and Adjustments

  • Guidance on making adjustments for improved composition.

Final Touches and Evaluation Preparation

  • Techniques for final touches and finishing details.
  • Discussion on the importance of presentation.
  • Demonstration on varnishing and sealing finished paintings.
  • Application of varnish on completed paintings.

Outcome: By the end of the Advanced Level, students will have mastered the art of oil painting, demonstrated through ambitious projects and large format paintings. They will be prepared to pursue a career in oil painting or continue their artistic journey with a strong sense of confidence and identity.

Images are for representation purpose only.

Perfect For You

OIL PAINTING COURSE FEES

Choose your Level

You can choose your level as follows:

LEVEL 1 – CERTIFICATE – 32 SESSIONS. EACH SESSION IS FOR 45 MINUTES

LEVEL 2- ADVANCED CERTIFICATE – 48 SESSIONS. EACH SESSION IS FOR 45 MINUTES

PORTFOLIO CREATION AND SUBMISSION:  (OPTIONAL) – RECOMMENDED

1 EXPLANATORY SESSION + 1 VIDEO LESSON

Creating a portfolio as an art student is crucial for showcasing your skills, style, and artistic journey to potential clients, employers, or admission committees.

8 Sessions Plan

50% OFF
3995
1995 PER MONTH
  • 2 Months Validity
  • Minimum 2 months payment
  • Portolio & Assessment (Optional)
  • E-Certificate Free

Registration: Rs. 500 (Online) / Rs. 1000 (Campus) | 1 eBook: Rs.350 

16 Sessions Plan

63% OFF
7990
2995 PER MONTH
  • 2 Months Validity
  • Minimum 2 months payment
  • Portolio & Assessment (Optional)
  • E-Certificate Free
THE BEST

Registration: Rs. 500 (Online) / Rs. 1000 (Campus) | 2 eBooks: Rs.350 * 2  

OIL PAINTING COURSE

“I dream my painting and I paint my dream.”
― Vincent Willem Van Gogh

Few representative artwork images

art_classes_for_adults

Unleash Your Creativity at "Oil Painting Course" - Where Art Meets Happiness!

summer_camp

OIL PAINTING COURSE

“I dream my painting and I paint my dream.”
― Vincent Willem Van Gogh

Oil painting - Wikipedia

Oil painting is the process of painting with pigments with a medium of drying oil as the binder. Commonly used drying oils include linseed oilpoppy seed oilwalnut oil, and safflower oil

The choice of oil imparts a range of properties to the oil paint, such as the amount of yellowing or drying time. Certain differences, depending on the oil, are also visible in the sheen of the paints. 

An artist might use several different oils in the same painting depending on specific pigments and effects desired. The paints themselves also develop a particular consistency depending on the medium. The oil may be boiled with a resin, such as pine resin or frankincense, to create a varnish prized for its body and gloss.

The oldest known oil paintings were created by Buddhist artists in Afghanistan and date back to the 7th century AD.[1] The technique of binding pigments in oil was known in Europe by at least the 12th century. 

The adoption of oil paint by Europeans began with Early Netherlandish painting in Northern Europe, and by the height of the Renaissance, oil painting techniques had almost completely replaced the use of tempera paints in the majority of Europe.

In recent years, water miscible oil paint has become available. Water-soluble paints are either engineered or an emulsifier has been added that allows them to be thinned with water rather than paint thinner, and allows, when sufficiently diluted, very fast drying times (1–3 days) when compared with traditional oils (1–3 weeks).

Techniques

Traditional oil painting techniques often begin with the artist sketching the subject onto the canvas with charcoal or thinned paint. Oil paint is usually mixed with linseed oil, artist grade mineral spirits, or other solvents to make the paint thinner, faster or slower-drying. (Because the solvents thin the oil in the paint, they can also be used to clean paint brushes.) 
 

A basic rule of oil paint application is ‘fat over lean‘, meaning that each additional layer of paint should contain more oil than the layer below to allow proper drying. If each additional layer contains less oil, the final painting will crack and peel. 

This rule does not ensure permanence; it is the quality and type of oil that leads to a strong and stable paint film.

There are other media that can be used with the oil, including cold wax, resins, and varnishes. These additional media can aid the painter in adjusting the translucency of the paint, the sheen of the paint, the density or ‘body’ of the paint, and the ability of the paint to hold or conceal the brushstroke. 

These aspects of the paint are closely related to the expressive capacity of oil paint.

Traditionally, paint was most often transferred to the painting surface using paintbrushes, but there are other methods, including using palette knives and rags. 

Oil paint remains wet longer than many other types of artists’ materials, enabling the artist to change the color, texture or form of the figure. At times, the painter might even remove an entire layer of paint and begin anew. T

his can be done with a rag and some turpentine for a time while the paint is wet, but after a while the hardened layer must be scraped off. Oil paint dries by oxidation, not evaporation, and is usually dry to the touch within a span of two weeks (some colors dry within days).

 It is generally dry enough to be varnished in six months to a year

Oil painting is the process of painting with pigments with a medium of drying oil as the binder. Commonly used drying oils include linseed oilpoppy seed oilwalnut oil, and safflower oil

The choice of oil imparts a range of properties to the oil paint, such as the amount of yellowing or drying time. Certain differences, depending on the oil, are also visible in the sheen of the paints. 

An artist might use several different oils in the same painting depending on specific pigments and effects desired. The paints themselves also develop a particular consistency depending on the medium. The oil may be boiled with a resin, such as pine resin or frankincense, to create a varnish prized for its body and gloss.

The oldest known oil paintings were created by Buddhist artists in Afghanistan and date back to the 7th century AD.[1] The technique of binding pigments in oil was known in Europe by at least the 12th century. 

The adoption of oil paint by Europeans began with Early Netherlandish painting in Northern Europe, and by the height of the Renaissance, oil painting techniques had almost completely replaced the use of tempera paints in the majority of Europe.

In recent years, water miscible oil paint has become available. Water-soluble paints are either engineered or an emulsifier has been added that allows them to be thinned with water rather than paint thinner, and allows, when sufficiently diluted, very fast drying times (1–3 days) when compared with traditional oils (1–3 weeks).

Techniques

Traditional oil painting techniques often begin with the artist sketching the subject onto the canvas with charcoal or thinned paint. Oil paint is usually mixed with linseed oil, artist grade mineral spirits, or other solvents to make the paint thinner, faster or slower-drying. (Because the solvents thin the oil in the paint, they can also be used to clean paint brushes.) 
 

A basic rule of oil paint application is ‘fat over lean‘, meaning that each additional layer of paint should contain more oil than the layer below to allow proper drying. If each additional layer contains less oil, the final painting will crack and peel. 

This rule does not ensure permanence; it is the quality and type of oil that leads to a strong and stable paint film.

There are other media that can be used with the oil, including cold wax, resins, and varnishes. These additional media can aid the painter in adjusting the translucency of the paint, the sheen of the paint, the density or ‘body’ of the paint, and the ability of the paint to hold or conceal the brushstroke. 

These aspects of the paint are closely related to the expressive capacity of oil paint.

Traditionally, paint was most often transferred to the painting surface using paintbrushes, but there are other methods, including using palette knives and rags. 

Oil paint remains wet longer than many other types of artists’ materials, enabling the artist to change the color, texture or form of the figure. At times, the painter might even remove an entire layer of paint and begin anew. T

his can be done with a rag and some turpentine for a time while the paint is wet, but after a while the hardened layer must be scraped off. Oil paint dries by oxidation, not evaporation, and is usually dry to the touch within a span of two weeks (some colors dry within days).

 It is generally dry enough to be varnished in six months to a year

Kindly note: Images in the website are for representation purpose only. All sources acknowledged

Oil Painting Course

© 2024 All Rights Reserved.

×
Table of Contents