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Certificate in Basic Watercolour​ – Basic to higher level

$149.25 $14.93

Certificate in Watercolor

Learn to paint in watercolour in a structured approach Water Colour is the starting point for many aspiring artists after they have got to grips with drawing technique.

The course – Certificate in Watercolor –  gives a broad approach to painting with watercolor which the students will find informative and inspirational. With this exciting and glowing medium help you realise your own inventive instincts and support you as you set out on this path.

The course -Certificate in Watercolor – gives a broad approach to painting with watercolor which the students will find informative and inspirational. With this exciting and glowing medium help you realise your own inventive instincts and support you as you set out on this path.

It is also for students interested in developing painting portfolios for admission to college-level programs, and for individuals looking to create paintings for personal enrichment and other professional opportunities.

Learn how to manipulate your paints to stunning effect, get hints and tips on working and re-working your paintings as they dry, and discover painting techniques that will add a stunning depth, light and character to your work.

According to vocabulary.com:

Watercolors are a type of paint that can be mixed with water to create translucent layers of color on paper. You can also call a painting made this way a watercolor. Anyone can paint with watercolors, from toddlers to professional artists.

Historians believe that watercolor painting has been around since Paleolithic cave paintings, but it was during the Renaissance that watercolors gained popularity as an artistic medium. It was particularly common for illustrations in books and botanical guides to be made using watercolors into the 19th century, when John James Audubon began his well-known watercolor bird illustrations and field guides

https://www.britannica.com/ says:

Watercolour, also spelled Watercolor, pigment ground in gum, usually gum arabic, and applied with brush and water to a painting surface, usually paper; the term also denotes a work of art executed in this medium. 

The pigment is ordinarily transparent but can be made opaque by mixing with a whiting and in this form is known as body colour, or gouache (q.v.); it can also be mixed with casein, a phosphoprotein of milk.

Watercolour compares in range and variety with any other painting method. Transparent watercolour allows for a freshness and luminosity in its washes and for a deft calligraphic brushwork that makes it a most alluring medium. There is one basic difference between transparent watercolour and all other heavy painting mediums—its transparency. The oil painter can paint one opaque colour over another until he has achieved his desired result. The whites are created with opaque white. 

The watercolourist’s approach is the opposite. In essence, instead of building up he leaves out. The white paper creates the whites. The darkest accents may be placed on the paper with the pigment as it comes out of the tube or with very little water mixed with it. Otherwise the colours are diluted with water. The more water in the wash, the more the paper affects the colours; for example, vermilion, a warm red, will gradually turn into a cool pink as it is thinned with more water.

The dry-brush technique—the use of the brush containing pigment but little water, dragged over the rough surface of the paper—creates various granular effects similar to those of crayon drawing. Whole compositions can be made in this way. This technique also may be used over dull washes to enliven them.

Simple Watercolor basics techniques are:

  1. Wet on wet
  2. Wet on dry
  3. Watercolor washes
  4. Color blending
  5. Color layering
  6. Flat wash
  7. Dry brush
  8. Underpainting
  9. Blooms
  10. Back Washes
  11. Feathering
  12. Hatching and Cross Hatching
  13. Scumbling
  14. Stippling
  15. Splattering
  16. Lifting colors

Watercolor papers are usually cold pressed papers, and gives better texture and look with GSM between 200 to 300. Watercolors are usually translucent, and appear luminous because the pigments are laid down in a pure form with few fillers obscuring the pigment colors. Watercolors can also be made opaque by adding Chinese white.

Watercolour paint is an ancient form of painting. In East Asia, watercolor painting with inks is referred to as brush painting or scroll painting. In ChineseKorean and Japanese painting it has been the dominant medium, often in monochrome black or browns, often using inkstick or other pigments. India, Ethiopia and other countries have long watercolor painting traditions as well.

American artists in the early 19th century seemed to regard watercolor primarily as a sketching tool in preparation for the “finished” work in oil or engraving.

Watercolor basics

Watercolor – an introduction from Wikipedia:

Watercolor (American English) or watercolour (British Englishsee spelling differences), also aquarelle (French, from Italian diminutive of Latin aqua “water”),[1] is a painting method in which the paints are made of pigments suspended in a water-based solution. Watercolor refers to both the medium and the resulting artwork. Aquarelles painted with water-soluble colored ink instead of modern water colors are called “aquarellum atramento” (Latin for “aquarelle made with ink”) by experts. However, this term has been more and more passing out of use.[2][3]

The traditional and most common support—material to which the paint is applied—for watercolor paintings is watercolor paper. Other supports include papyrus, bark papers, plastics, vellumleatherfabric, wood and watercolor canvas (coated with a gesso that is specially formulated for use with watercolours). Watercolor paper is often made entirely or partially with cotton.[4] This gives the surface the appropriate texture and minimizes distortion when wet.[5]

Watercolor papers are usually cold pressed papers, and gives better texture and look with GSM between 200 to 300. Watercolors are usually translucent, and appear luminous because the pigments are laid down in a pure form with few fillers obscuring the pigment colors. Watercolors can also be made opaque by adding Chinese white.

Watercolour paint is an ancient form of painting. In East Asia, watercolor painting with inks is referred to as brush painting or scroll painting. In ChineseKorean and Japanese painting it has been the dominant medium, often in monochrome black or browns, often using inkstick or other pigments. India, Ethiopia and other countries have long watercolor painting traditions as well.

American artists in the early 19th century seemed to regard watercolor primarily as a sketching tool in preparation for the “finished” work in oil or engraving.

Watercolor paint consists of four principal ingredients: a pigmentgum arabic as a binder to hold the pigment in suspension; additives like glycerinox gallhoney, and preservatives to alter the viscosity, hiding, durability or color of the pigment and vehicle mixture; and evaporating water, as a solvent used to thin or dilute the paint for application.

The more general term watermedia refers to any painting medium that uses water as a solvent and that can be applied with a brushpen, or sprayer. This includes most inkswatercolorstemperascaseinsgouaches, and modern acrylic paints.

The term “watercolor” refers to paints that use water-soluble, complex carbohydrates as a binder. Originally (in the 16th to 18th centuries), watercolor binders were sugars and/or hide glues, but since the 19th century, the preferred binder is natural gum arabic, with glycerin and/or honey as additives to improve plasticity and solubility of the binder, and with other chemicals added to improve product shelf life.

Certificate_in_watercolor

In this Certificate in Watercolor course, you will learn:

  • Certificate in watercolor – an intro – Basic Washes
  • Certificate in watercolor – Blending Colours
  • Certificate in watercolor –  Layering Method
  • Certificate in watercolor –  Light and Shadow Practice
  • Certificate in watercolor –  Practical 1 – Paint a Vegetable 1 – Scallion
  • Certificate in watercolor –  Practical 2 – Paint a vegetable 2 – Turnip
  • Certificate in watercolor –   Practical 3 – Paint a Fruit
  • Certificate in watercolor –  Practical 4 –  Basic Still Life
  • Certificate in watercolor –  Practical 5 – Flower
  • Certificate in watercolor –  Practical 6 – Painting a Bird in Watercolour
  • Certificate in watercolor – Practical 8 – Landscape Painting 1
  • Certificate in watercolor – Practical 9 – Landscape Painting 2
  • Certificate in watercolor – Practical 10 – Seascape Painting 1
  • Certificate in watercolor – Practical 11 – Seascape Painting 1

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